Click to Home
Go To Search
RSS
Print
Man-Made
Man-Made Disasters GraphicOverview
Man-made disasters are disaster resulting from man-made hazards (threats having an element of human intent, negligence, or error involving a failure of a man-made system), as opposed to natural disasters resulting from natural hazards. Such man-made disasters are crime, arson, civil disorder, terrorism, war, biological / chemical threat, cyber attacks, etc.

Terrorism
Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom. Terrorists often use threats to create fear among the public, to try to convince citizens that their government is powerless to prevent terrorism, and to get immediate publicity for their causes.

Acts of terrorism range from threats of terrorism, assassinations, kidnappings, hijackings, bomb scares and bombings, and cyber attacks (computer-based), to the use of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons.

High-risk targets include military and civilian government facilities, international airports, large cities, and high-profile landmarks. Terrorists might also target large public gatherings, water and food supplies, utilities, and corporate centers. Further, they are capable of spreading fear by sending explosives or chemical and biological agents through the mail.

In the immediate area of a terrorist event, you would need to rely on police, fire and other officials for instructions. However, you can prepare in much the same way you would prepare for other crisis events.

9-11 Terrorist AttackPreparing for Terrorism
  • Wherever you are, be aware of your surroundings. The very nature of terrorism suggests there may be little or no warning.
  • Take precautions when traveling. Be aware of conspicuous or unusual behavior. Do not accept packages from strangers. Do not leave luggage unattended. Unusual behavior, suspicious packages and strange devices should be promptly reported to the police or security personnel.
  • Do not be afraid to move or leave if you feel uncomfortable or if something does not seem right.
  • Learn where emergency exits are located in buildings you frequent. Notice where exits are when you enter unfamiliar buildings. Plan how to get out of a building, subway or congested public area or traffic. Note where staircases are located. Notice heavy or breakable objects that could move, fall or break in an explosion.
  • Assemble a disaster supply kit at home and learn first aid. Separate the supplies you would take if you had to evacuate quickly, and put them in a backpack or container, ready to go.
  • Be familiar with different types of fire extinguishers and how to locate them. Know the location and availability of hard hats in buildings in which you spend a lot of time.

Bomb Threats
If you receive a bomb threat, get as much information from the caller as possible. Keep the caller on the line and record everything that is said. Then notify the police and the building management.

If you are notified of a bomb threat, do not touch any suspicious packages. Clear the area around suspicious packages and notify the police immediately. In evacuating a building, don't stand in front of windows, glass doors, or other potentially hazardous areas. Do not block sidewalk or streets to be used by emergency officials or others still exiting the building.

Suspicious Parcels & Letters
Be wary of suspicious packages and letters. They can contain explosives, chemical, or biological agents. Be particularly cautious at your place of employment. Some typical characteristics postal inspectors have detected over the years, which ought to trigger suspicion, include parcels that:
  • Are unexpected or from someone unfamiliar to you
  • Are marked with restrictive endorsements, such as "Personal," "Confidential" or "Do not x-ray"
  • Have protruding wires or aluminum foil, strange odors, or stains
  • Show a city or state in the postmark that doesn't match the return address
  • Are of unusual weight, given their size, or are lopsided or oddly shaped
  • Are marked with any threatening language
  • Have inappropriate or unusual labeling
  • Have excessive postage or excessive packaging material such as masking tape and string
  • Have misspellings of common words
  • Are addressed to someone no longer with your organization or are otherwise outdated
  • Have incorrect titles or title without a name
  • Are not addressed to a specific person
  • Have handwritten or poorly typed addresses

With suspicious envelopes and packages other than those that might contain explosives, take these additional steps against possible biological and chemical agents:
  • Refrain from eating or drinking in a designated mail handling area.
  • Place suspicious envelopes or packages in a plastic bag or some other type of container to prevent leakage of contents. Never sniff or smell suspect mail.
  • If you do not have a container, then cover the envelope or package with anything available (e.g., clothing, paper, trash can, etc.) and do not remove the cover.
  • Leave the room and close the door, or section off the area to prevent others from entering.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water to prevent spreading any powder to your face.
  • If you are at work, report the incident to your building security official or an available supervisor, who should notify police and other authorities without delay.
  • List all people who were in the room or area when this suspicious letter or package was recognized. Give a copy of this list to both the local public health authorities and law enforcement officials for follow-up investigations and advice.
  • If you are at home, report the incident to local police.